How to Grow and Care for a Comfrey (Symphytum officinale)

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Comfrey (Symphytum officinale) was once a popular medicinal herb. We’ve recently learned that it can be a carcinogenic when taken internally, but it is still used as a topical treatment for skin irritations, cuts, sprains and swelling and as livestock feed and compost. Because of its tall stature and ease of care, it is also a popular ornamental plant. Comfrey is in the same family as Borage.

Comfrey shoots up quickly early in the season and can easily reach heights of around 5 feet (1.5 m). The lower leaves are equally large, somewhat dwarfing the hanging clusters of flowers at the top of the plant. The form and size of the plants might have you thinking it’s a shrub, but it will die back to the ground in the winter and it does not get woody.

Growing Conditions

Light: Full sun to partial shade.
Water: Because of its tap root, Comfrey is very drought tolerant. However regular watering will keep it growing strong and blooming.
Hardiness Zone: USDA Hardiness Zones 4 – 9
Soil: It is widely adapted but it will thrive in a rich organic soil.

Symphytum officinale - Comfrey

Photo via flickr.com

Growing Tips

Comfrey can be grown from seed, but it requires a winter chilling period to geminate. If all you want is one plant, you can usually find them for a reasonable price in the herb section of local nurseries or by mail order. Plants can go outdoors once danger of frost has passed.

When starting several plants, it is more common to use root cuttings. These are 2 to 6 inches (5 to 15 cm) lengths of root which are planted horizontally 2 to 8 inches (5 to 20 cm) deep. Plant shallow in clay soil and deeper in sandy soils.

You can also grow Comfrey from crown cuttings, but these will be more expensive. A crown cutting will include several eyes and may grow faster than root cuttings, however the difference is negligible. Crown cuttings are planted 3 to 6 inches (7.5 to 15 cm) deep.

If you are growing several plants for harvesting, space them in a grid, 3 feet (90 cm) apart.

Comfrey is widely adapted but it will thrive in a rich organic soil. As with all rapid growers, it needs a lot of nitrogen. Comfrey gets all its nitrogen from the soil, so some type of regular organic matter is essential. It is not particular about soil pH. A neutral to acidic range of 6.0 – 7.0 is ideal.

Maintenance

Once Comfrey is established it will take care of itself. Each year the plant will get a little larger and the root system will get more dense. It is very hard to get rid of an established plant. Comfrey can live several decades before it begins to decline.

Because of its tap root, Comfrey is very drought tolerant. However regular watering will keep it growing strong and blooming.

Pests and Diseases

No insects are known to be problems of Comfrey. There is a Comfrey rust that can overwinter in roots and decrease vigor and yield, but it is not common in most areas.

Source: about.com

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