Calendula arvensis (Field Marigold)

Scientific Name

Calendula arvensis M.Bieb.

Common Names

Field Marigold

Synonyms

Calendula arvensis subsp. arvensis

Scientific Classification

Family: Asteraceae
Subfamily: Asteroideae
Tribe: Calenduleae
Genus: Calendula

Flower

Color: Bright yellow to yellow-orange
Bloom Time: June to November

Description

Calendula arvensis is an annual or biennial herb up to 20 inches (50 cm) tall. The leaves are lance-shaped and borne on petioles from the slender, hairy stem. The inflorescence is a single flower head up to 1.6 inches (4 cm) wide, with bright yellow to yellow-orange ray florets around a center of yellow disc florets. The fruit is an achene which can take any of three shapes, including ring-shaped.

Calendula arvensis - Field Marigold
Photo via pallano.altervista.org

How to Grow and Care

The Calendula flower or flowering herb is an annual which will readily reseed. Too much care can result in stunted or slow growth of the plants. Poor to average, well draining soil and only occasional watering after plants are established is the secret to growing prolific Calendula plants.

Like most herbs, Calendulas are adaptable and do not require a lot of maintenance. Roots will often adapt to the space provided. The amazing Pot Marigold can be grown in containers or beds in full sun to shade conditions. As the Calendulas prefer cool temperatures, flowers last longer in filtered sun or shady areas.

If deadheaded regularly, this plant can bloom from spring through fall and beyond. In warmer areas, the Calendula may take a break from blooming during summer heat and then put on a show as temperatures fall in autumn. Regular pinching keeps the 1- to 3-foot (30 to 90 cm) plant bushy and prevents tall, spindly stalks… – See more at: How to Grow and Care for Calendula.

Origin

Native to central and southern Europe.

Links

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